Kathleen Mary Baillie

Birth

Marriage

Death

April 10, 1892, at Bethany Mission Station, Swaziland

___ Jemison, on ___ at ___

On November 19, 1976, at ___

Parents

Siblings

Children

John Baillie, Annie E. Grieve

John Henry Baillie, Frances Emma Baillie, Andrew Welcome Baillie, Robert Grieve Baillie

None

(Click on thumbnail for full picture)

 

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Kathleen Mary Baillie with rocking horse, aged about 3

Kathleen Mary Baillie was born on April 10, 1892. She died in 1977.

Sources:

(1) Birth: Jim Kallam, note to Peter G. Moll.

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Kathleen Mary Baillie, nurse, 1912.

Kathleen Mary Baillie trained as a nurse in England. The date 1912 is mentioned on the reverse of the next photograph.

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Kathleen Mary Baillie with six nurses, received for nursing training, 1912.

Kathleen is in the front row on the right, as indicated by the handwritten comment. On the reverse side of the photograph, which was done as a postcard, is written "England 1912. Kathleen with others received in Training Home the same term".

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Kathleen Mary Baillie at a store meeting at Mseleni mission station.

Kathleen, in a wide-brimmed hat, is on the right with her back turned.

 

 Grave of Kathleen Mary Baillie

Zuurfontein Cemetery, grave number 2516, Plane Street, Kempton Park, between Isando Road and Kelvin Road, adjacent to a sports field. Location: From the front entrance, go straight forward about 200 meters. Go to the last block before the opposite fence. The grave is on the left hand side, about the 4th row from the front. The text reads "In loving memory of "Aunty" / Kathleen Mary Jemison neé Baillie / 1892 - 1976 / Trust in the Lord, Ps. 37:3". The word "neé" is sic. The gravestone carries the signature "West" on the bottom left hand corner; presumably this was the designer. Size: 4' wide and 3' high. The burial is registered in the book of the Cemetery as "Cathreen Marie Gemison" and is therefore to be found on the pages for "G", not "J". The book records the death as November 19, 1976. The name had been phoned through and probably the note-taker was Afrikaans-speaking, hence the "Marie".

 

 

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